Monthly Archives: February 2010

Build Business Relationships Through Shock and Awe

I had the opportunity to meet with the CEO of a Fortune 500 company to pitch a project I wanted to do for them. In his spacious office John Wayne was everywhere: posters, autographed pictures, and even a life-sized cardboard cutout of the Duke himself standing in one corner of the office.

I commented on the memorabilia and he mentioned to me everyone who comes to his office wants to add to his collection, and the way he said it, I got the feeling his interest became more the passion of others with their gifts.

As I was leaving after my presentation I noticed one thing framed that had nothing to do with John Wayne. It was a certificate from Star Fleet Command. He was a closet Trekkie! When I asked about that particular framed certificate his eyes lit up and he told me all about his week at Star Trek camp! You never know do you?

In the thank you note to him for giving me his time I included two inexpensive items I found on ebay. One was a Star Trek communicator the actors would hit on their chest to communicate with others on board. The second was a red enamel Klingon war pin.

In the note I told him he could use these as indicators when he walked into meetings. If the communicator pin was on it was open communication. If he was wearing the Klingon war pin – the warrior was loose.

Continue reading

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

How’s Your Bounce?

I remember growing up playing with a Super Ball. I could bounce this ball from shoulder height on the driveway and have it bounce higher than the rooftop on my two-story house! People and companies need to have that type of bounce ability when facing tough times.

We are well versed in people and companies who struggle in bad times. It’s almost become sport in this county to see who falls on their face next. The falls make the headlines but what about the rest of the story after the fall? Those stories rarely make the headlines and that is actually where the greatest lessons exist in how well people and companies recover from their falls. Whether it’s personal or corporate there is going to be adversity in our journeys and how we respond and how quickly we respond demonstrated out bounce. You have options in your bounce ability.

What about the people who fall, fail or flounder only to bounce back stronger than ever? Robert Downey Jr. has good bounce. Vanessa Williams has good bounce. Starbucks has good bounce. How about you?
Continue reading

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

What’s the Difference? The Generations

In talking with a group of managers about the Next Generation I was trying to explain the differences between the generations and this guy from my audience says, “I don’t know what’s up with my younger employees but someone was handing out stupid and they were grabbing all they could get!.” Sure everyone laughed, but he failed to see the joke – because he didn’t have a mirror in front of him.

This new generation of workers is more intelligent, more technologically savvy, and better able to accomplish a multitude of tasks than generations prior. They are not stupid.

They also will not tolerate boorish managers, incomplete information and lack of proper training. There is where the stupid lies – in how managers are treating this generation that have the potential to make your organization soar! Continue reading

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

Get Ready for Customer VIP: Vast Influential Power

By Russell J. White

I’ve always trained my clients that when dealing with an angry customer try to move them to a private place to address their issue because angry customers love to broadcast to an audience.

The days of “a private place” are over thanks to social media and the smart phone power to instantly notify thousands of people in real time about how; you the customer are being dealt with.

The old math used to be that only one of every twenty five customers complained and on average an upset customer would tell 16 other people. So the math used to be for every complaint you received, roughly 400 people would hear about your bad service.

Currently, I have over 6800 twitter followers, 900 facebook friends and 250 facebook fans. That is 7,950 people a click away. I also have a blog as do millions of other potential complaining customers. My numbers are by no means the top of the heap. In fact, I would say for those involved in social media, they would be slightly above average.

For the sake of argument, let’s assume my numbers are average and that one complaint still represents 24 other people just as upset who didn’t bother to let you know.  Under the new math of social media, for every complaint you receive, roughly (7950 X 25) 198,750 will hear about your bad service! Whoa! Continue reading

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

Are the Right People on Your Bus?

By Russell J White

The people closest to you in your personal and professional lives will have a tremendous influence on who you become. As a friend of mine told me, “I put people in my life who don’t let anything stop them.”

They have the same success mindset she does, and at her young age she has accomplished more than most people do in a lifetime. How does she do this?

Think of yourself as a bus driver and the seats behind you are occupied by those closest to you. What are you hearing from them? How do they act from day to day? How much of a priority are you to them? What actions are they doing you are proud of? What positive influence do you feel in their presence?

People you want on your bus Continue reading

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter